Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Pic(k) of the week 26: Wooden boat (Lake Orta) - Back to the film days with Analog Efex Pro 2

While being pretty much stuck to the indoors here in Dubai, where the Summer has started, it is a perfect time to experiment with some new image editing software.

Those of you that have been following me for a while, know that I'm a huge fan of the Nik Software collection (now owned by Google); especially the Color Efex Pro 4 and Silver Efex Pro 2 plugins for Photoshop and Lightroom. 

Some time ago, Nik Software came out with their latest plugin called Analog Efex. Even though I tried it, I never included it in my workflow and found it a bit gimmicky. Recently they came out with the new version, "Analog Efex Pro 2", a complete different ball-game and free upgrade if you own the previous one! 

Without doing a full software review, it is a plugin that lets one "develop" (edit) digital images and give them an analog "film" look. To start of, there are a large variety of presets (also referred to Classic Cameras) where one can change things like film types, vignettes, add light leaks, film grain (different to noise!) and even add dirt and scratches. 

Even though I did not use the features on the image below, there is also an option of doing double exposures, add rotation blur and even distortion... A perfect boost for my photographic creativity!

The image below was shot a few weeks ago at Lake Orta, North of Milan Italy. As I don't like to use "modern" features when giving a film look to a photograph, the old wooden boat with the island of San Giulio in the distance, makes for a great candidate!

Wooden boat at Lake Orta


































Image details:
Fujifilm X-T1 with the XF 10-24mm f4 Fujinon lens
ISO 640, 23mm (34mm full frame equivalent), f11, 1/250s
RAW file imported in Lightroom 5.5
Nik Analog Efex Pro 2 to create the film look

Expect to see more Analog Efex Pro 2 goodies, as the humidity and temperatures in Dubai are on the rise. 

Till then, remember: "A photograph is often looked at, rarely looked into" - Ansel Adams

BJORN







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